Slipstreaming PSP2, IE11, USB3.0 and NVMe into Windows 7 Installation Media


Contents

Introduction

Windows 7 was released in 2009. The latest installation media Microsoft Provide is the 2011 Media Refresh .iso. Microsoft released the Convenience Rollup in April 2016 which in reality is a pseudo-Service Pack (PSP). This guide will instruct in slipstreaming the Convenience Rollup which I prefer to call “Pseudo Service Pack 2” aswell as Internet Explorer 11 and driver support such as USB 3.0 and NVMe support which Windows 7 doesn’t natively support.

I have gave step by step instructions in quite some detail but I would still say that this guide is designed for Advanced Users.

This guide assumes unmodified .isos are used. Results may be interesting with .isos that have previously been modified.

Obtaining a Windows 7 Installation .iso

There are three ways to obtain a Windows Installation .iso…

  1. For those with an OEM or Retail key a Windows 7 SP1 .iso can be downloaded from Microsoft following the instructions in Download a Windows 7 SP1 Commercial OEM and Retail.iso.
    • If you have downloaded the Windows 7 SP1 .iso from Microsoft follow the instructions below to slipstream the Convenience Rollup, USB 3.0 support, NVMe support and IE11.
  2. Dell Windows 7 Reinstallation Skylake .isos are available to Download see here for more details see Download Windows 7 SP2 OEM and Retail .iso.
    • These .isos are usually multilingual.
    • They will apply the generic Dell OEM System Locked Preinstallation (SLP) keys which automatically activate on systems that have a valid Dell Legacy BIOS certified for Windows 7 or a Dell UEFI BIOS certified for Windows 8.1 Pro or Dell UEFI BIOS certified for Windows 10 Pro.
    • They have Dell OEM Branding and Dell OEM Desktop and Lockscreen Backgrounds.
    • These .isos also incorporate IE11, USB 3.0 and NVMe support so the rest of this guide isn’t required.
  3. For those with a Retail Windows 7 Installation DVD or OEM Windows 7 Reinstallation DVD one may directly convert it into a .iso (instructions at the end) however should copy the installation files from it directly to begin the slipstream.
    • This guide does not support the uses of DVDs without Service Pack 1 and does not provide instructions to slipstream Service Pack 1.
      • If you are using a Dell Windows 7 Reinstallation DVD ensure it has Service Pack 1. If it doesn’t see options 2. or 3.
      • If you have a Retail DVD or Commercial OEM DVD its recommended to Download a Windows 7 SP1 Commercial OEM and Retail.iso. These .isos are media refresh 2011 and full and do not have some of the limitations from store bought Upgrade only DVDs.
    • If you have downloaded the Windows 7 SP1 .iso from Microsoft follow the instructions below to slipstream the Convenience Rollup, USB 3.0 support, NVMe support and IE11.

Creation of a Bootable USB

If you are starting out with a Windows 7 Installation DVD/Dell Windows 7 Reinstallation DVD you can ignore this step for now (you will need to revisit at the end when you have created an up to date .iso). Proceed straight to Slipstreaming the Convenience Rollup, USB 3.0 Support, NVMe Support and Internet Explorer 11

Once you have the .iso and Rufus downloaded, launch Rufus:

7

Select yes at the user account control prompt.

The order in which you use Rufus is very important…

FAILURE TO USE RUFUS IN THE CORRECT ORDER MAY RESULT IN THE WRONG TYPE OF BOOTABLE USB BEING CREATED.

To the top select your USB Device, it must be 8-16 GB.

2

Next although its at the bottom you must load the .iso:

3

Select the .iso you wish to make a Bootable USB from and select open:

win7sp1a

Select the partition scheme that you want either the “GPT partition scheme for UEFI" or “the MBR partition scheme for BIOS or UEFI-CSM".

Use the GPT partition scheme for UEFI BIOS if your SMBIOS is version 2.7 or later and you are installing 64 Bit Windows 7 otherwise use the MBR partition scheme. To determine your SMBIOS version and for more details about a UEFI BIOS see Unified Extensive Firmware Interface.

5

If you select the Partition Scheme and Target System Type as “GPT partition scheme for UEFI" the File System should be automatically selected as “FAT32" if not amend it as the USB won’t boot if its not FAT32. If the .wim file is >4 GB it will automatically select NRFS opposed to FAT32. These settings will still result in a functional Bootable USB.

If you select the Partition Scheme and Target System Type as “MBR Partition Scheme for BIOS of UEFI-CSM" the File System should be automatically selected as “NTFS" if not amend it.

6 7

Once you have the settings ready select Start:

8

Select Ok to acknowledge that you are going to format the USB flash drive:

9

Rufus will now make the installation media.

10

Once its completed the task, the progress bar will be full and it will say Ready below it. You can now close Rufus. You have your Windows 7 Service Pack 1 Reinstallation USB prepared:

113

Slipstreaming the Convenience Rollup, USB 3.0 Support, NVMe Support and Internet Explorer 11

I will use a batch script to slipstream SP2 and IE11 in order to create an updated boot.wim and install.wim. Its important to use the same folders and file names otherwise this batch script won’t work for you.

The text file used to create a batch file is listed here alongside a complimentary text file which lists the direct download links to updates which need to be downloaded from Microsoft and the Intel USB 3.0 Creator Utility v3 from Intel:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B7uwifuW-47rUlVEWUR6bWNDMWM?usp=sharing

Open the USB or DVD within Windows Explorer and aerosnap it to the left.

capture1

To the right open up the C:\ Drive and make a new folder. Call this folder Win7 with no spaces:

capture2 capture3

Copy the entire contents from the DVD or Bootable USB to this Win7 folder:

capture4

Next prepare a folder and call it Updates and a second folder called IE11.

32 Bit Windows

Add the following files to the Updates folder:

  • Windows6.1-KB3020369-x86.msuh
  • windows6.1-kb3125574-v4-x86_ba1ff5537312561795cc04db0b02fbb0a74b2cbd.msu
  • Windows6.1-KB2729094-v2-x86.msu
  • Windows6.1-KB2670838-x86.msu
  • Windows6.1-KB2834140-v2-x86.msu
  • Windows6.1-KB2639308-x86.msu

updates1

Add the following file to the IE11 folder:

  • IE11-Windows6.1-KB2841134-x86.cab

updates2

64 Bit Windows

Add the following files to the Updates folder:

  • Windows6.1-KB3020369-x64.msu
  • Windows6.1-KB2990941-v3-x64.msu
  • Windows6.1-KB3087873-v2-x64.msu
  • windows6.1-kb3125574-v4-x64_2dafb1d203c8964239af3048b5dd4b1264cd93b9.msu
  • Windows6.1-KB2729094-v2-x64.msu
  • Windows6.1-KB2670838-x64.msu
  • Windows6.1-KB2834140-v2-x64.msu
  • Windows6.1-KB2639308-x64.msu

updates3

Two of the downloads 477475_intl_x64_zip.exe and 486575_intl_x64_zip.exe are packaged .exe files. These must be extracted to get the .msu files Windows6.1-KB2990941-v3-x64.msu and Windows6.1-KB3087873-v2-x64.msu respectively.

Add the following file to the IE11 folder:

  • IE11-Windows6.1-KB2841134-x64.cab

updates-4

Move the IE11 folder to the Updates folder:

capture6

capture9

Then move the Updates folder to the C:\Drive

capture10

You should now have a Win7 folder and an Updates folder.

capture11

Lastly we need the USB 3.0 Drivers which you should have downloaded from Intel. With these drivers there are instructions and a utility. This utility doesn’t work well and we will ignore it.

Extract the compressed folder and open the extracted folder.

capture12

Ignore the Installer Creator Application and pdf. Instead open the USB_Drivers folder:

capture13

If you are adding drivers to 32 Bit Windows select the x86 folder. In the case of 64 Bit Windows select the x64 folder:

capture14

These are the USB 3.0 drivers:

capture15

Create a new folder on the C:\ Drive and call it Drivers copy the drivers across to this folder:

capture16 capture17

capture18

In some cases (not shown) you may wish to add SATA preinstallation drivers to this folder. These should be in the same format (and not a .exe). If your system is not an Intel system you may need to get USB 3.0 drivers from elsewhere. They have to be extracted so they match a similar format to the Intel Drivers in the screenshot above.

Navigate to the C:\Win7\Sources there will be a large number of files here. We are interested only in three. I am using files from an untouched Dell Windows 7 Pro 32 Bit Reinstallation DVD as an example:

capture19

Boot.wim

The Boot.wim – USB 3.0 drivers must be added to the Windows Setup in order to use USB 3.0 ports (for keyboard, mouse and Bootable USB) in the initial stages of the Windows 7 setup. The Windows 7 Setup is image index 2. Windows PE is image index 1 not used for the installation.

Information about the boot.wim file can be found out by typing in dism /Get-WimInfo /WimFile:c:\win7\sources\boot.wim into an elevated command prompt (optional step). I will demonstrate this with Windows 7 Pro English Commercial OEM 32 Bit and 64 Bit .isos (all normal English Editions should have a boot.wim of the same file size). I will also demonstrate using Dell Windows 7 Pro SP1 Multilingual Reinstallation DVDs 32 Bit and 64 Bit. There may be variances in Reinstallation DVDs, English only ones are available for instance but I don’t have these to hand.

To get an elevated command prompt search for CMD. The command prompt should be listed at the top, ensure you right click it and select Run as Administrator:

11

Accept the user account control prompt:

uac

The Windows 7 boot.wim information for a 32 Bit English Microsoft Windows 7 COEM or Retail SP1 Media Refresh 2011 .iso:

3

The Windows 7 boot.wim information for a 64 Bit English Microsoft Windows 7 COEM or Retail SP1 Media Refresh 2011 .iso:

1

The Windows 7 boot.wim information for a 32 Bit Dell Windows 7 SP1 Pro Multilingual Reinstallation DVD:

7

The Windows 7 boot.wim information for a 64 Bit Dell Windows 7 SP1 Pro Multilingual Reinstallation DVD:

5

Install.wim

The Install.wim – USB 3.0 drivers and NVMe support must be added to this to use USB 3.0 ports for the rest of the Windows setup and to recognised NVMe SSDs. The convenience rollup and IE11 must be added to this to get an up to date Windows 7 installation.

  • 5 image indexes – Windows 7 OEM/Retail 32 Bit
  • 4 image indexes – Windows 7 OEM/Retail 64 Bit

Information about the boot.wim file can be found out by typing in dism /Get-WimInfo /WimFile:c:\win7\sources\install.wim into an elevated command prompt (optional step). I will demonstrate this with Windows 7 Pro English Commercial OEM 32 Bit and 64 Bit .isos (all normal English Editions should have a install.wim of the same file size) and with Dell Windows 7 Pro SP1 Multilingual Reinstallation DVDs 32 Bit and 64 Bit. There may be variances in Reinstallation DVDs depending on region.

The Windows 7 install.wim information for a 32 Bit English Microsoft Windows 7 COEM or Retail SP1 Media Refresh 2011 .iso:

4

The Windows 7 install.wim information for a 64 Bit English Microsoft Windows 7 COEM or Retail SP1 Media Refresh 2011 .iso:

2

The Windows 7 install.wim information for a 32 Bit Dell Windows 7 SP1 Pro Reinstallation DVD:

8

The Windows 7 install.wim information for a 64 Bit Dell Windows 7 SP1 Pro Reinstallation DVD:

6

The EI.cfg is a text configuration file which dictates the Edition of Windows 7 to be installed. This may be deleted (optional) more details about this later.

Simply open up the NVMe Slipstream notepad file in notepad.

  • The file creates a series of temporary directories.
  • To the first directory it extracts the boot.wim and adds USB 3.0 drivers. It then repackages the boot.wim. I have used image index #2 opposed to the image name as there are slight differences in the image name between different installation media c.f. Windows 7 Setup vs Microsoft Windows Setup.
  • To the second to sixth directories it extracts the each Edition of Windows 7 and adds the convenience rollup, IE11, USB 3.0 and NVMe support then repackages the install.wim. This stage is time-consuming as its the equivalent of 8-10 Windows 7 installations. In the script file I have used the image name as the names are consistent across all the installation media I’ve tried. The Dell installation media is multilingual which is why it is so much larger in size. I have assumed all Editions of Windows 7 will be updated, you can however save time by only updating the Edition of Windows 7 you want to install.
  • It then deletes the temporary directories.

acap1

To use this script we need to go to file save as:

acap2

Ensure save as type is set to all files and add the .bat extension to the file name. This will save it as a batch file:

acap3

Right click the batch file and select run as administrator:

acap4

Accept the User Account Control:

acap5

Wait for the script to execute. The command prompt window will automatically close when finished:

acap6

Once the scripts done you should notice that the boot.wim and install.wim are now larger in size.

Microsoft Windows 7 English 32 Bit boot.wim: 141,343 KB

Microsoft Windows 7 English 32 Bit boot.wim Updated: 145,609 KB

Microsoft Windows 7 English 32 Bit install.wim: 2,880,037 KB

Microsoft Windows 7 English 32 Bit install.wim: Updated: 2,196,305 KB

 

Microsoft Windows 7 English 64 Bit boot.wim: 164,693 KB

Microsoft Windows 7 English 64 Bit boot.wim Updated: 168,969 KB

Microsoft Windows 7 English 64 Bit install.wim: 2,885,158KB

Microsoft Windows 7 English 64 Bit install.wim Updated: 3,894,251 KB

 

Dell Windows 7 Multilingual 32 Bit boot.wim: 280,471 KB

Dell Windows 7 Multilingual 32 Bit boot.wim Updated: 293,832 KB

Dell Windows 7 Multilingual 32 Bit install.wim: 2,194,904 KB

Dell Windows 7 Multilingual 32 Bit install.wim: Updated: 2,878,386 KB

 

Dell Windows 7 Multilingual 64 Bit boot.wim: 303,197 KB

Dell Windows 7 Multilingual 64 Bit boot.wim Updated: 316,587 KB

Dell Windows 7 Multilingual 64 Bit install.wim: 2,883,767 KB

Dell Windows 7 Multilingual 64 Bit install.wim: Updated: 3,892,742 KB

aacap

The Updated Windows 7 boot.wim and install.wim information for a 32 Bit English Microsoft Windows 7 COEM or Retail SP1 Media Refresh 2011 .iso:

microsoftwin7x86b microsoftwin7x86a

The Updated Windows 7 boot.wim and install.wim information for a 64 Bit English Microsoft Windows 7 COEM or Retail SP1 Media Refresh 2011 .iso:

microsoftwin7x64b microsoftwin7x64a

The Updated Windows 7 boot.wim and install.wim information for a 32 Bit Dell Windows 7 SP1 Pro Reinstallation DVD:

dellwin7x86 dellwin7x86b

The Updated Windows 7 boot.wim and install.wim information for a 64 Bit Dell Windows 7 SP1 Pro Reinstallation DVD:

dell64a dell64b

If you’ve made a Bootable USB already (i.e. originally started out from a Commercial OEM or Retail .iso) then you can simply replace the boot.wim and install.wim files on the Bootable USB with their newer variants.

Delete the EI.cfg file

The EI.cfg found in C:\Win7\Sources is a configuration file which can be opened in notepad and has the form:

[EditionID]
Professional
[Channel]
OEM
[VL]
0

[EditionID] can be Starter, HomeBasic, HomePremium, Professional or Ultimate.

[Channel] can be OEM or Retail.

[VL] should be 0 for OEM and Retail Licenses.

For a Retail or Commerical or OEM .iso this file can be deleted turning the .iso into a multiple Edition .iso. For a Dell Windows 7 Reinstallation DVD this file shouldn’t be deleted as its removal will stop OEM System Locked Preinstallation being automatically applied.

9 10 11

Without an EI.cfg you during the Windows 7 setup you will be prompted to select your Edition.

1a 1b

Note the date modified of the install.wim isn’t updated despite the Convenience Rollup being slipstreamed.

Create a Windows 7 PSP2 April 2016 Refresh .iso

To create an up to date .iso you will need to use Imgburn.

For ImgBurn installation don’t opt to install any unwanted software. See Installing Imgburn without bloatware. Note Google Chrome will automatically block the ImgBurn website and the ImgBurn .exe due to the unwanted software embedded within the installer so use Internet Explorer to download it. It is advised to Scan your System with Malwarebytes’ Antimalware after installing ImgBurn.

Launch ImgBurn. Select Create Image File from File/Folders:

26

Press the folder button to the left to add a folder to the source:

27

Select the Win7 folder:

28

Now go to advanced on the right hand side:

29

Select Bootable Disc to the right hand side:30

Tick make Image Bootable and select the folder button for the Bootable Image (the software displays a folder icon here but it should be a file icon):

31

Select etfsboot and select open:

32

Type in Microsoft Corporation in Developer ID and change the sectors to load to 8:

33

Select the Build Button:

34

Select a save location and name the .iso and select save:

35

Give the .iso a ISO9660 and UDF label (or just leave the defaults) then select yes:

36

Select ok to begin the .iso creation:

37

Wait for ImgBurn to make the .iso. Select ok when its finished. You may then close down the program:

38

The size of my Microsoft English Windows 7 Convenience Rollup .isos with EI.cfg removed are as shown yours might be slightly different in size if you kept the EI.cfg or added SATA preinstallation drivers:

final-result-english

My Dell Windows 7 Multilingual Reinstallation .isos are as shown:

psp2

Should you wish to make media from the .iso you made see the above instructions Create a Bootable USB for UEFI BIOS or Legacy BIOS.

After you’ve done that you now have a Windows 7 Media Refresh April 2016 Bootable USB 3.0 Flash Drive which you can use to Clean Install Windows 7 see Windows 7 Installation with Notes on UEFI and SecureBoot.

Creating a Windows 7 .iso from a DVD (Obsolete)

An .iso can be created from the slipstreamed Windows 7 setup files or from the original DVD.

I will instruct on the creation of a .iso using two different programs. ImgBurn can be used to create a .iso from the slipstreamed Windows 7 setup files or from the original DVD and is hence the recommended utility. WinImage can only be used to create a .iso from the original DVD hence has limited use for this updated guide.

Note ImgBurn unfortunately has prebundled bloatware which discourages a great many people from using it. Some virus scanners flag up the bloatware embedded within the installer.

ImgBurn Variant

For ImgBurn installation don’t opt to install any unwanted software. See Installing Imgburn without bloatware. Note Google Chrome will automatically block the ImgBurn website and the ImgBurn .exe due to the unwanted software embedded within the installer so use Internet Explorer to download it. It is advised to Scan your System with Malwarebytes’ Antimalware after installing ImgBurn.

You will need to install the following:

Launch ImgBurn and select Create Image from Disc.
1

Select the DVD Drive and then click on the folder destination of the .iso.

2

Name the .iso appropriately and select Save.


3

Press the CD/DVD to .iso button.

4

You will be informed that the .iso is created successfully.

WinImage Variant

You will need to download the following:

Select the winima90.exe for a Windows 7 32 Bit install and the winima6490.exe for a Windows 7 64 Bit install.

Close all programs. Double click the wima6490.exe to begin the install:

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h46m31s705

Select yes at the User Account Control Prompt:

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h46m37s987

Select Next:

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h46m45s127

Select Next:

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h46m49s883

Accept the License Agreement and select Next:

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h47m16s221

Select Next again:

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h47m21s782

Uncheck the Desktop shortcut and select next:

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h47m28s156

Select next:

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h47m34s117

WinImage will now finally install:

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h47m48s963

Select finish:

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h47m54s562

Now insert your Dell Windows 7 Reinstallation DVD. Check the Drive letter in this case it is D:

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h46m16s442 vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h46m24s589

Now WinImage is an extremely fussy program, it will not work correctly if instances of Windows Explorer are open. I advise closing all programs.

WinImage also needs to be run as an administrator. Go to Start → All Programs.

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h48m03s351

To launch it go to start and left click the WinImage folder to expand it. The right click WinImage (administrator):

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h48m14s108

Select Run as Administrator:

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h48m20s733

Select yes at the user account control:

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h48m33s194

Select ok:

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h48m41s054

WinImage will now open:

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h48m49s630

Select Disk then select Use CD-Rom D: (match the Drive letter of your Dell Windows 7 Reinstallation DVD):

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h49m10s229

Select Disk again and note that Use CD-Rom D: is now checked. Select Create CD-Rom ISO image:

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h49m27s234

Select Browse:

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h49m37s727

Select the save location in this case Desktop and input an appropriate file name. Then select save:

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h50m10s931

Select ok:

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h50m25s414

Wait for it to read the disk. If an error comes up “Windows error: The process cannot access the file because it is being used by another process” than you have an instance of Windows Explorer open and need to close it and retry.

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h50m53s577

Once done your .iso will be open in WinImage. You may now close WinImage.

vlcsnap-2016-04-06-19h51m00s081

9 thoughts on “Slipstreaming PSP2, IE11, USB3.0 and NVMe into Windows 7 Installation Media

  1. Philip, First of all, I want to thank you for all the great information you’ve put together and made available. I totally agree with you that Dell’s support has gone way down the tubes.

    Second, I’ve been following your instructions, I thought to the letter, but I’ve been unable to get a fresh installation of Win 7 on my Dell Inspiron N5010. I have also been unable to get media ordered from Dell, and even if I could, my COA is faded, so I don’t think I’d be able to activate it.

    So I followed your instructions. I downloaded the ISO from Digital River, converted it to USB using Rufus. After starting the installation process and following the first restart the following error message pops up: “Windows could not parse or process the unattend answer file for pass [specialize]. The settings specified in the answer file cannot be applied. The error was detected while processing settings for component [Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup].” When I clicked on the OK button, the machine rebooted, looked like it was continuing the installation process. But then another error popped up saying “The computer restarted unexpectedly or encountered an unexpected error. Windows installation cannot proceed. To install Windows, click “OK” to restart the computer, and then restart the installation. Clicking on OK at this point just repeated the second part of the process over again in a loop.

    Have you run into this before? Can you offer any help? I’m stumped.

  2. I downloaded the Dell windows 7 x64 sp1 usb3.0 iso you have provided. Is it possible to create a USB 3.0 bootable pendrive with a computer which only has usb 2.0 ? but my pendrive is a 3.0.

    1. Yes but the addition of USB 3.0 support is only needed if installation is being carried out on a computer that has a USB 3.0 port.

      A USB 3.0 drive can be used in a computer with only USB 2.0 ports without the additional modifications.

      1. Thanks a lot Philip. I really appreciate what you do here. This site is a big help. Thanks again.

  3. Thank you for this website. Do you have any recommendations if I have say 10 Dell computers that came pre-loaded with Windows 7 and I want to load my company’s own Windows 7 image which I captured form one of these computers on the other 9?

    On the other 9 Windows would need to be activated/validated/whatever and typically in the past I’d just type in the product key from the Microsoft sticker on the computer. For these recent batch of computers though, they didn’t come with the Microsoft stickers (not even under the laptop batteries).

    PS: Sorry for double posting this, I didn’t see that this site has two comment fields? Reposting here because of the email notification feature.

    1. Officially you should look into volume licensing…

      Cloning and Image wise it would be fine for a Windows 10 OEM license and Windows 10 install as it will automatically recognise the system as a Windows 10 Device and reactivate it (taking the unique 25 digit product key from the UEFI BIOS in each system).

      What will happen for the Windows 7 install is you will have 9 unactivated windows 7 installs as it thinks you have transferred an OEM license… The product key used in each case will be the generic 25 digit Dell Windows 7 Pro OEM SLP key.

      Unofficially you can use the likes of Macrium Reflect… to make your system image (or your preferred program):
      http://dellwindowsreinstallationguide.com/backing-up-your-windows-installation-using-macrium-reflect/

      To reactivate you can use the ABR program to rearm the Dell OEM System Locked Preinstallation:
      http://dellwindowsreinstallationguide.com/the-activation-backup-and-recovery-program-windows-vista-7-version/

      This will only work if the systems came with Windows 10 Pro OEM and hence have downgrade rights to Windows 7 Pro OEM. It will not work if the systems shipped with Windows 10 Home OEM.

  4. Philip Hi,

    I am texting you here coz I could not login to this Forum below and explain my problem.
    http://en.community.dell.com/support-forums/laptop/f/3518/t/19666782?pi41097=1
    I have a big problem now. I hope you reply as soon as you see this message. I have googled for one week but to no avail …I have a received a DEll Precision 7510, with 256 GB Samsung P951 NVMe SSD drive and 1TBHDD. IT is core i7 with 6820 Hq processor. The laptop has come with win7 originally installed on it in RAID config mode in BIOS. Now My problem is I have to install Ubuntu on it in dual Boot mode and for that we have to enable the AHCI mode in BIOS, So I decided to make a clean installation of win7 by referring to your guide above of converting USB int bootable media. Now in the BIOS I was able to see the USB detect and give it a higher priority for boot, So I managed to get the windows installer.In the installer I had to download the Samsung SSD driver and upload it during installation from another USB to see the SSD listed in the windows partitions. I could also see the HDD ,So I deleted all the partitions of the SSD and installed win 7 on it. So the windows installed successfully, but after installation, now I want to install all the drivers. I downloaded all the drivers on my second machine and when I plugged in the USB in the newly installed windows, the USB ports do not work. Nor does the Mouse.When I go to the BIOS menu, even there the USB is not detected any more, and I only see two option for the Boot “Windows Boot Manager” and ” NVME SSD”. Now I don’t know what to do. I did make a backup image of the Factory installed windows by following one of your guides on Dell Back up and Recovery, and I even made a bootable USB from that using winimage, but to no avail, the Bootable USB is not listed in the BIOS options. Nor did converting to Legacy boot option work. I also tried F12 and then select USB in the Legacy options but that did not work. Now I am stuck I dont know what to do ..? I need the USB bootable to be detected in BIOS for linux installation and also in win 7 install to install all drivers..Can you please help

    My email is and currently my work is stuck because of this problem. Can you please reply on my mail or either here…I am desperately stuck…!!!!

    Edited to remove personal information.

    1. Seems it listing both a legacy and UEFI BIOS.

      For Windows 7 64 Bit you want to install in GPT and not MBR. SecureBoot should be off, Legacy Roms should be enabled. Leave the SATA Operation as AHCI.

      If you do this can your Windows 7 installation boot? If so try following this guide here. Ignore the part about mounting the drive as read only and instead of recovering data, add the drivers to the C: drive so you can install them:
      http://dellwindowsreinstallationguide.com/data-recovery-using-fedora/

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